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HEALTH

Re:Vision Explain Age-related Macular Degeneration

Tuesday 12 March 2019, 2:41PM
By Beckie Wright
424 views


Re:Vision are focused on making excellence in eye care accessible to everyone who needs it, and as February was Macular Degeneration Month in New Zealand, this month they are focusing on this aspect of eye diseases and their care.

Macular degeneration is the leading cause of severe, irreversible vision loss in people over age 60. It occurs when the small central portion of the retina, known as the macula, deteriorates. The retina is the light-sensing nerve tissue at the back of the eye. Because the disease develops as a person ages, it is often referred to as age-related macular degeneration (AMD). Although macular degeneration is almost never a totally blinding condition, it can be a source of significant visual disability.

There are two main types of age-related macular degeneration:

Dry form. The "dry" form of macular degeneration is characterized by the presence of yellow deposits, called drusen, in the macula. A few small drusen may not cause changes in vision; however, as they grow in size and increase in number, they may lead to a dimming or distortion of vision that people find most noticeable when they read.

Wet form. The "wet" form of macular degeneration is characterised by the growth of abnormal blood vessels from the choroid underneath the macula. This is called choroidal neovascularization. These blood vessels leak blood and fluid into the retina, causing distortion of vision that makes straight lines look wavy, as well as blind spots and loss of central vision. These abnormal blood vessels and their bleeding eventually form a scar, leading to permanent loss of central vision.

It is very important for people with macular degeneration to monitor their eyesight carefully and see their eye doctor on a regular basis. As the name suggests, age-related macular degeneration is more common in older adults. In fact, it is the leading cause of severe vision loss in adults over age 60.

 

Macular degeneration may be hereditary, meaning it can be passed on from parents to children. If someone in your family has or had the condition you may be at higher risk for developing macular degeneration, so you should talk to your eye doctor about your individual risk. Smoking, high blood pressure, high cholesterol, obesity, and being light skinned, female, and having a light eye color are also risk factors for macular degeneration, so for more information on lens replacement surgery,  laser eye surgery and corneal transplant surgery please go to http://revision.nz/ .