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Upgrade serves up better drinking water for Ngaruawahia

Thursday 1 November 2012, 10:07AM

By Waikato District Council

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A recent upgrade at the Ngaruawahia Water Treatment Plant involved the refurbishment of the filter structure, including this filter bed, which will help to achieve a greater flow rate and allow for the production of more water.
A recent upgrade at the Ngaruawahia Water Treatment Plant involved the refurbishment of the filter structure, including this filter bed, which will help to achieve a greater flow rate and allow for the production of more water. Credit: Waikato District Council
Waikato District Council's upgrade of its Ngaruawahia Water Treatment Plant included introducing new chemical dosing equipment which will improve the safe handling of chemicals.
Waikato District Council's upgrade of its Ngaruawahia Water Treatment Plant included introducing new chemical dosing equipment which will improve the safe handling of chemicals. Credit: Waikato District Council
Contractors work to install powder activated carbon dosing at the raw water intake during the upgrade of the Ngaruawahia Water Treatment Plant.
Contractors work to install powder activated carbon dosing at the raw water intake during the upgrade of the Ngaruawahia Water Treatment Plant. Credit: Waikato District Council

NGARUAWAHIA

The Ngaruawahia community can now enjoy improved drinking water thanks to the Waikato District Council’s upgrade of its Ngaruawahia Water Treatment Plant.

The upgrade, which was finished earlier this month after almost two and half years of work, was the result of a need to improve equipment, health and safety for staff and compliance with drinking water standards.

General Manager water and facilities Richard Bax said the upgrade produced a number of benefits for both the Ngaruawahia community and the council.

“We spent a long time considering the options for this upgrade and we are really pleased with the outcome. The water quality has been improved for the community and there is increased health and safety for our staff.”

Mr Bax said the upgrade had also seen the plant expanded to allow for additional water capacity, from 3.6 million litres per day (MLD) to 4.5MLD, to accommodate future population growth.

The total cost of the project was $2.85 million and Mr Bax said the upgraded facility had already seen a reduction in operational costs.

The upgrade included the installation of new chemical dosing equipment which will help to remove algae toxins from the water, the replacement of pipe work, valves, actuators and filter sand, the refurbishment of the filter structure and a full replacement of the electrical systems.