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Police Minister Anne Tolley says the first car crushing under laws to crack down on illegal street racing should serve as a warning to boy racers. Police Minister Anne Tolley says the first car crushing under laws to crack down on illegal street racing should serve as a warning to boy racers. CREDIT: Anne Tolley

Car crushing a warning for boy racers

Thursday 21 June 2012, 2:24PM
By Anne Tolley
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Police Minister Anne Tolley says the first car crushing under laws to crack down on illegal street racing should serve as a warning to boy racers.

The car’s owner had been found guilty of driving while suspended, sustained loss of traction and dangerous driving, leading to a 21- month disqualification. The court ordered his car to be seized and destroyed following his third strike under the Sentencing (Vehicle Confiscation) Amendment Act.

“This offender has found out the hard way that the Government will not tolerate illegal street racing,” says Mrs Tolley.

“Our communities have no time for boy racers and their dangerous behaviour, excessive noise and public disorder.

“The law targeting illegal street racing has been an effective deterrent since being introduced in late 2009, with a total reduction in offences of 29.6 per cent in 2010 and 2011.

“There are currently 116 offenders on two strikes, and those who are not clever enough to heed the warning should be aware that their cars could be seized and undergo a radical change in shape.

“The owner of the car crushed today in Lower Hutt is particularly foolish. Less than three hours after receiving his third strike from the court, he was back behind the wheel, performed a ‘burn out', lost control and crashed into a fence.

“He is currently awaiting sentencing on his fourth strike.

“This kind of anti-social behaviour just won’t be tolerated.

“Lives are at risk, and Police are vigilant and completely focused on making our roads and our communities safer.”

Cars to be crushed are purchased from the Government by the wrecking company and stripped prior to crushing. The company can then recoup its costs by selling salvageable parts.